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Gurewamukuru legend buried in Musana

Gurewamukuru members from many parts of the country were among hundreds of people who thronged Musana village in Mashonaland Central province to bid farewell to one of the legends of the traditional dance, Laytan Losat.

Losat was believed to have been one of the longest surviving members of the gure traditional dance community.

He is said to have been in his late 80's at time of his passing last Sunday.

True to tradition, the pallbearers were all gure dancers, clad in full dance attire. Burial proceedings were accompanied by gure dances from Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique, much to the awe of the locals who are mostly Shona by origin.

Originally from Mozambique, Laytan moved to Musana after his retirement at Shamva Gold Mine.

During an interview with Standard Style at the grave site, his son Coffee Kalonga (50) had this to say: “The crowd of mourners is a testimony of my father's greatness.”

“He taught us to preserve our culture.”

Popularly known as President in gure circles, Laytan is survived by a wife, 12 children and several grandchildren.

By Ronnie Chisamba

Gurewamukuru members from many parts of the country were among hundreds of people who thronged Musana village in Mashonaland Central province to bid farewell to one of the legends of the traditional dance, Laytan Losat.

Losat was believed to have been one of the longest surviving members of the gure traditional dance community.

He is said to have been in his late 80's at time of his passing last Sunday.

True to tradition, the pallbearers were all gure dancers, clad in full dance attire. Burial proceedings were accompanied by gure dances from Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique, much to the awe of the locals who are mostly Shona by origin.

Originally from Mozambique, Laytan moved to Musana after his retirement at Shamva Gold Mine.

During an interview with Standard Style at the grave site, his son Coffee Kalonga (50) had this to say: “The crowd of mourners is a testimony of my father's greatness.”

“He taught us to preserve our culture.”

Popularly known as President in gure circles, Laytan is survived by a wife, 12 children and several grandchildren.

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